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Canada Industry News Update November 2019

Posted by: Preston Pierce
27/11/2019
Industry News

Ontario set for $200 million centralized operations facility 

The City of Guelph, ON is moving forward with a new $200 million centralized facility for transit, fleet and maintenance operations. It would house everything from city busses to snow plows and many of the operations used to maintain city facilities.

Planning and design of the $197.4 million “city operations campus” have been approved and the project will be located on city-owned land on Dunlop Drive beside the municipal solid waste management facility.

A city staff report cites a number of reasons for the project’s approval, including inadequate space, overcrowding, safety and efficiency issues at current operations facilities, many of which were built in the 1960s.

General Manager for facilities management Antti Vilkko said in a report: “Guelph’s existing operations facilities are not adequate to meet Guelph’s current or future needs. Several operational departments within the city have inadequate space to accommodate existing staff and vehicles, including busses and equipment.

“The current size and condition constraints of these buildings are causing operating inefficiencies and potential hazards for staff and visitors due to conflicts with vehicle and equipment overcrowding in the yards and bays.”

Building condition assessments conducted in 2018 identified maintenance issues that require significant capital and operating investments to keep them operational.

The new facility cost is estimated at $197 million and will be paid for with grants ($34.7 million), development charges ($58.2 million) and tax reserve funds ($99 million).

“Several operational departments within the city are constrained by inadequate space to accommodate existing staff and vehicles, including city busses and equipment. This problem will be compounded as the city continues to grow” staff wrote in the report.

“In addition to space constraints, many of the operational buildings were built in the 1960s and are at the end of their useful life. Building condition assessments conducted in 2018 have identified maintenance issues that will require significant capital and operating investments to keep them operational.”

Some of the challenges listed in the report include overcrowding, inadequate maintenance bays and inability to add additional bays to service the existing fleet of vehicles, inability to store expensive equipment and vehicles indoors due to lack of space, inefficient and insufficient indoor parking for fleet vehicles. Full story.

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